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The Psychology Of Free Will



In this video, I talk about free will as a religious concept rather than a scientific one.

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#Psychology #Free

Some Toughts (20)

  1. Avatar
    added on 18 Sep, 2020
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    People have a will but they don't have a free will. People are forced to think and do the types of things that their type of genetics and their types of life experiences force them to think and do on a life experience by life experience basis. And it's not anybody's fault that they exist, are human, and are forced to be whatever way that their type of genetics and their types of life experiences force them to be.
    The only way the way people are would be their fault is if they willingly chose to come into existence and if they created themselves and if they made themselves be exactly the way that they want to be in every single way, but that's not possible.

  2. Avatar
    added on 18 Sep, 2020
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    I think the fact that free will is a religious concept is something that needs to be talked about more often. It's so ingrained into society nowadays that most people don't even stop to question it.

    But free will as a religious concept makes so much sense … There really is no such thing as free will if we are all a product of our circumstances (which we can't control – though we still have some leeway with our actions, it's not as much as "free will" claims we have), but religion frequently overlooks that – which leads to things like judgment being passed on others without having the full story of what's going on. Science wants to understand why; but religion assumes it was the decision of the person to act out of line. Science holds that everyone's actions have a cause which pushes them to behave this way; religion seeks to pin the blame, usually without looking further – and it often uses the concept of free will to do so.

    It can also be twisted around to blame the victim, trying to make them seem guilty for some decision they made (if you hadn't done this, that wouldn't have happened!). Which is also selective thinking, but that's not really a surprise.

    This was very enlightening. Thank you for sharing this!

  3. Avatar
    added on 18 Sep, 2020
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    I want people to die if they no longer want to exist. But what I do want is for no one to suffer in any way against their will.

  4. Avatar
    added on 18 Sep, 2020
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    Our psychology is in need of an update (somehow? cultural change? genetic engineering?). Cognitive biases served their evolutionary purposes but now they are getting in the way of our ability to process and make sense of the massive amounts of information we're getting.

    The reasons why we aren't properly dealing with large scale issues like climate change, war, inequality, disease etc are psychological at the root. Our brains are set up for individual (also familial/tribal) survival but we don't seem to extend it to the global/species wide level.

  5. Avatar
    added on 18 Sep, 2020
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    Great video, thanks a lot.

  6. Avatar
    added on 18 Sep, 2020
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    I can't agree, Saddam Hussein and his kids were horrific.
    I was glad to see them go.

  7. Avatar
    added on 18 Sep, 2020
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    I used to be a baptist christian. I felt very happy while in it, but I realize that it was a non-genuine happy and I wasn't dealing with the truthfulness of my problems. I was wondering if you think a mental illness could happen once someone leaves a religion? This disorder seemed to have something to do with me leaving and happened around the time that I decided to leave. It's interesting because it seems ridiculous to want to live a life of suffering and pain, but I would rather life this life (while being released and free from religion's binds) than the one I previously had.

  8. Avatar
    added on 18 Sep, 2020
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    Behave by Robert Sapolsky speaks alot on brain biology and behavior.

  9. Avatar
    added on 18 Sep, 2020
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    Hi Owen, first – I'll check out your book recommendations. Second, if you haven't read it already, read Free Will by Sam Harris. I'll send you my copy if you'd like. Third, I made a short poem on this topic the other day (Neural Nursery Rhyme, found here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6zBJVJEggwE ), the only comment I feel the need to clarify is that I agree with you about blame, but for exactly the same reason can you blame someone for blaming someone? Personally I see this as implying we need to acknowledge the mechanism so we can research better ways to deal with unconscionable behavior – either way we respond to outside influence (in complex ways and to varying degrees)

  10. Avatar
    added on 18 Sep, 2020
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    I do enjoy your videos. Please look at the camera? BTW your right on with this topic. Thanks.

  11. Avatar
    added on 19 Sep, 2020
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    Didn't you say RBG would never die a few days ago? Yeah that aged well.

  12. Avatar
    added on 19 Sep, 2020
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    This reminds me of reading Collision with the Infinite many years ago and marveling at the author's apparent sudden Buddhist style enlightenment. She had been a serious yoga practitioner for many years but it was stepping onto a bus one day and suddenly losing her 'I'. It never returned. About 15 years later she died of a brain tumor. Seems clear to me that it was the tumor making those changes in her brain but as a yogini her interpretation was enlightenment.

  13. Avatar
    added on 19 Sep, 2020
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    As for free will, I don't think that we have total control over our lives. We can make choices, but our actions have consequences and can affect other people. Living forever sounds terrible. Living for a long time, might be nice, but to live forever would probably get very boring. As for a person living in poverty who grew up in a crappy family, didn't have the money to go to college and joined a gang at a young age and had to steal money from others in order to feed themselves.

    You can't really blame them for doing what they did, but they are still accountable for their actions, and we as a society could have done things to help that person by providing them with resources and opportunities so that they might leave the gang, maybe could go to counseling and therapy, could learn essential life skills, learn job training skills, get their G.E.D. and perhaps go to college to where they can have a career that pays them well , perhaps then they could buy a home and a car, maybe even start a family of their own one day.

  14. Avatar
    added on 19 Sep, 2020
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    Everyone makes bad decisions and we can confirm that brain activity, externally compromised or not, is the most likely cause. Sometimes is makes sense to just throw your hands up and say “people are crazy!”

    My idea is that the most primitive simple brain only made a decision for an organism to NOT automatically move toward something it was biologically attracted to. This may have prevented the overconsumption of environmental toxins or depletion of resources for a species. It didn’t just resolve an external survival issue, it was a mechanism to create an internal conflict.
    Pretty sure nobody would call that “consciousness.” From there, it makes a lot of sense that we all have multitudes of impulses that we’re not even aware of.

    I’d say that our biological subconscious impulses, the feedback loop between our perceptions and how our brains assign value to them for future decision-making is what most people would call “consciousness” AKA “free will.”

  15. Avatar
    added on 19 Sep, 2020
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    Sorry man, that study about brain waves was debunked. There's a reason they showed orders of magnitude differentiation in result times from seconds to milliseconds, and that's because they were taking the nearest peak in brainwave oscillation patterns as a significant indicator, rather than as just an oscillation. Follow up studies accounting for that showed no such result. It was an illusion caused by over interpretation of the data.

  16. Avatar
    added on 19 Sep, 2020
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    Good discussion. This is part of the reason I am in favour of abolishing prisons. (Like "defund the police", my position is a tad more nuanced, because I understand that some people are a danger to the society and cannot be left wandering around.) The number of people who actually make a conscious choice when they are committing a crime is very few. So it is only those people who make that conscious choice using free will that should, to my mind, be punished.

    She's coming at it from a different angle but ContraPoints recently released part 1 of a series on justice and I would definitely advise people to watch it.

  17. Avatar
    added on 19 Sep, 2020
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    I would express free will as the ability to deny natural instincts. Humans can clearly do this, even if it's often unhealthy

  18. Avatar
    added on 19 Sep, 2020
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    I eat pigger nussy 😎

  19. Avatar
    added on 20 Sep, 2020
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    If people who refused to wear masks only harmed themselves I would care far less. Sort of like safety belt laws and Motorcycle helmets. I think you should use them but I care far less about them because in the end they are the ones who will suffer for their choices. The mask thing though is different. Wearing a mask helps protects others from you. So I put on a mask not for me, but for the people who I am going to be near enough to effect. By refusing a mask you are telling me that you don't care about me or anyone else around.

  20. Avatar
    added on 20 Sep, 2020
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    I don't blame them as I don't blame me for killing them …

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